• Follow Me on Pinterest
  • Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

  • Garden events in Middle Tennessee

    Nov. 8: Fall Colors Bike and Hike at Shelby Bottoms, a bike/hike outing from the Nature Center to Stones River Farm (7 miles from the Nature Center) to enjoy fall colors, led by naturalist John Michael Cassidy. 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Participants should be comfortable riding 15+ miles. Registration required for this age 12-and-up activity, 862-8539.

    Nov. 8: Beekeeping 101 at Warner Park Nature Center, a workshop and overview of hobby beekeeping and how to start your own hive, and a presentation on bee biology. 9 a.m. – noon. Call to register for this adult-level workshop, 615-352-6299.

    Nov. 15: Great Gourds at Shelby Bottoms Nature Center, to learn about this ancient, multi-purpose vegetable. 2 – 3 p.m.; registration required for this all-ages program, 615-862-8539.

    Nov. 22: ReLeafing Day with the Nashville Tree Foundation, volunteer to plant trees in the Cleveland and McFerrin Park neighborhoods in East Nashville. Tree planting is 8:30 a.m. – noon. Meet at Glenn Elementary on Cleveland Street. To learn more or to volunteer: www.nashvilletreefoundation.org.

    Nov. 28: Holiday at Cheekwood opens with a full schedule of holiday-theme events and a live poinsettia tree made up from more than 500 individual poinsettias. Holiday at Cheekwood runs through Dec. 31. The complete schedule is at www.cheekwood.org.

    Dec. 4: Organic Gardening at Warner Park Nature Center, 9 – 10:30 a.m. Naturalist Deb Beazley leads a session on how and when to begin planning, planting and growing an organic garden. 615-352-6299 to register.

    Dec. 4: Holiday at Cheekwood live greenery design workshop. Complete information at www.cheekwood.org.

    Dec. 5 – 7: Tennessee Local Food Summit with “Barefoot Farmer” Jeff Poppen at Vanderbilt University, hosted by Vanderbilt’s Health Plus. Seminar topics range from backyard gardening to nutrition, cooking and climate change. Complete details at http://tnlocalfood.com.

    Dec. 7: Holiday at Cheekwood wreath-making workshop. Complete information at www.cheekwood.org.

  • Categories

  • Archives

Transplant a peony

When can peonies be separated and transplanted?
Peonies can be kind of fussy about where they’ll grow and what they’ll do if you try to move them. In fact, most garden experts will tell you that peonies seldom need dividing, and recover poorly from any attempt to do so.
That said, there’s a good time to do if, if you must, and that time is late summer or early fall. Make divisions or root cuttings with at least three growing points, then replant the divisions 18 to 24 inches apart. Plant them in a new bed that has been dug 12 inches deep, into which you have worked good compost or other organic matter. Pick a spot in full sun or a place that gets a little afternoon shade. Set plants in the ground at the same level or slightly higher than they were growing before you dug them up.
The cuttings should begin to grow next spring, so make sure they have sufficient moisture when they do. Judy Lowe, the author of Month-By-Month Gardening in Tennessee & Kentucky, suggests placing a half-inch of compost on top of the soil in spring and summer, and applying a slow-release fertilizer in mid-spring.
Then sit back and be patient. Even with this good care, it may take a couple of years for a transplanted peony to recover and bloom well again.

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 71 other followers

%d bloggers like this: