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  • Garden events in Middle Tennessee

    Now - Sept. 7: Andy Warhol’s Flowers exhibit at Cheekwood. Nearly a dozen screen prints from the artist’s original Flowers series, paintings, studio photographs and more. Information: www.cheekwood.org.

    Sept. 4 and Sept. 6: Grow Your Own Medicine Chest workshop, a hands-on workshop to learn what herbs to grow and use for bites and stings, poison ivy, colds and other maladies. 6 - 8 p.m. Sept. 4; 10 a.m. – noon Sept. 6. $45 per person. To register and to learn more about other upcoming workshops, visit The Cracked Pot Homestead.

    Sept. 7: The Nashville African Violet Club will meet at 1:45 at Grace United Methodist Church, 2905 N. Mt. Juliet Rd. in Mount Juliet with a program on growing African violets.  For more information, contact Julie at  Julie.mavity@gmail.com or 615-364-8459.

    Sept. 14: The Tennessee Gesneriad Society will meet at 2 p.m. at Cheekwood in Botanic Hall. The program will be a presentation on interesting gesneriads to grow.  To learn more, contact Julie at  Julie.mavity@gmail.com or 615-364-8459.

     Sept 16: Perennial Plant Society meets at Cheekwood’s Botanic Hall. Guest speaker is Randy Hedgepath, state naturalist for Tennessee State Parks, topic is “Identifying Native Plants and Wildflowers.” www.ppsmt.org. Refreshments at  6:30, program at 7, open to the public.

    Sept. 16: Orchid Society of Middle Tennessee meets at Cheekwood’s Botanic Hall with guest speaker Geraldine Powell of Orchid Gallery. http://tnorchid.org/. Refreshments at  6:30, program at 7, open to the public.

    Sept. 18: Lunch & Lecture on “Ordinary Plants with Extraordinary Stories” with guest Carol Reese, ornamental horticulture specialist at UT Extension. Noon – 1 p.m. at Cheekwood. $15 for members, $25 for non-members. www.cheekwood.org.

    Sept. 20: Herb Day – “A Closer Look at Herbs,” sponsored by the Herb Society of Nashville, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m. in Cheekwood’s Botanic hall. $47 per person ($42 if you register by Aug. 31); registration is required. Details at www.herbsocietynashville.org.

    Sept. 25: Fall Wildflower Hike at Warner Park Nature Center. Stroll through a meadow with naturalist Deb Beazley to enjoy the array of fall wildflowers, 9 – 11 a.m. Another hike is scheduled Sept. 27, 9 – 11 a.m. Call 352-6299 to register for this adult-level program.

    Sept. 27: Cheekwood Harvest, a six-week festival celebrating fall, opens with activities and specialty programs throughout the gardens, including a display of more than 5,000 autumn-hued chrysanthemums in the Robertson Ellis Color Garden. Complete details and schedule are at www.cheekwood.org.

     

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Don’t worry about the daffodils

It’s only January, and the daffodils in my yard are already coming up! How do I keep them from freezing?

Early risers: daffodils can survive winter.

It may seem too early for this unmistakable sign of spring, but it’s not unusual for the shoots of early daffodils to begin pushing up through the ground. In some places, they started coming up before Christmas. The best thing to do is: Nothing. In fact, there is nothing you can do. Spread some pine straw over the daffodil bed if it makes you feel better, but really, even that is an unnecessary step, says Anne Owen of the Middle Tennessee Daffodil Society.

We’re at the mercy of the weather fluctuations, but generally, a blast of cold weather won’t hurt the daffodils, Owen says. The worst that could happen is that the weather turns warm and stays warm enough for long enough that the daffodils bloom; then the flowers might succumb to a snap of extreme cold. If we get a freeze while only the leaves are up, they should survive without a problem.

Good reading

It’s a good time to sit down with a stack of seed catalogs (or a list of seed company URLs) and plan this year’s kitchen garden. Here are some of my favorites (where I indulge in a little wishful thinking):

Seed Savers’ Exchange (Unusual varieties not found at the big box store seed kiosks)

Seeds of Change (Seeds, supplies, and live plants, too)

Territorial Seed Company (Try out the online garden planner)

Southern Exposure Seed Exchange (“Particularly suited to the Mid-Atlantic and similar regions”)

Renee’s Garden (Pretty as a cottage garden)

Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds (Recipes included!)

John Scheepers Kitchen Garden Seeds (Straightforward, with tidy line drawings; more tips and entertaining reading at the website)

Brent & Becky’s Bulbs (One of the best sources for bulbs, say those in the know)

Burpee (for sheer volume, and all those luscious pictures!)

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