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  • Garden events in Middle Tennessee

    Now - Sept. 7: Andy Warhol’s Flowers exhibit at Cheekwood. Nearly a dozen screen prints from the artist’s original Flowers series, paintings, studio photographs and more. Information: www.cheekwood.org.

    Aug. 14 & Aug. 16: Cindy Shapton, the Cracked Pot Gardener workshop on Edible Organic Container Gardening, a hands-on workshop to learn to grow a container kitchen garden. Aug. 14, 6 – 8 p.m.; Aug. 16, 10 a.m. – noon. $45 per person. Register and learn more about other upcoming workshops at The Cracked Pot Homestead.

    Aug. 19: Carol Reese, of UT Gardens in Jackson, Tenn., is the guest speaker at this month’s Perennial Plant Society meeting. Topic is “Just Do It!” focusing on garden ideas and how to refresh older gardens. Refreshments at 6:30, meeting begins at 7 and the public is invited. Details at www.ppsmt.org.

    Aug. 19 & Aug. 23: Cindy Shapton, the Cracked Pot Gardener workshop on Tomatoes – Canning, Drying and Freezing, a hands-on workshop to learn about preserving tomatoes. Each workshop is 10 a.m. – noon. $45 per person.Tap here to register and to learn more about other upcoming workshops at The Cracked Pot Homestead.

    Aug. 21: Lunch & Lecture: Easy Gardens for the South, featuring author Harvey Cotton who describes the plants that are key in creating a successful, sustainable garden. Noon – 1 p.m., Cheekwood’s Potter Room. Tickets $15 for Cheekwood members, $25 for non-members. Details at www.cheekwood.org.

    Aug 21 & Aug. 26: Cindy Shapton, the Cracked Pot Gardener workshop All about Teas, a hands-on workshop. Aug. 21, 6 – 8 p.m.; Aug. 26, 10 a.m. – noon. $45 per person. Tap here to register and to learn more about other upcoming workshops at The Cracked Pot Homestead.

    Aug. 23: Organic Gardening 101. Visit the garden with naturalist Deb Beazley and learn the basics of how to start and grow your own garden at home. 9 – 11 a.m. Call 615-352-6299 to register for this adult level program.

    Aug. 28: Middle Tennessee Hosta Society meeting features hosta hybridizer Bob Solberg, whose topic, “Back to Basics, A Hosta Fact Sheet” is useful for beginners and experts. 6:30 p.m., Cheekwood’s Potter Room. Open to the public. Information on the Middle Tennessee Hosta Society is at www.mths-hosta.com.

    Aug. 28 & Sept. 2: Cindy Shapton, the Cracked Pot Gardener Pesto Party workshop, a hands-on workshop to learn to make original pesto and variations. Aug. 28, 6 – 8 p.m.; Sept. 2, 10 a.m. – noon. $45 per person. Tap here to register and to learn more about other upcoming workshops at The Cracked Pot Homestead.

     

     

     

     

     

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Good luck with ‘bamboo’

QUESTION: I have a “lucky bamboo” plant in a pot of water with pebbles that looked great for awhile, but now it has grown big shoots out of each of the stalks. Can I cut off these shoots and re-pot them?

The first thing you need to know about lucky bamboo that it’s not bamboo at all, but a plant in the genus Dracaena (specifically, D. Sanderiana). Its close kin includes two other popular houseplants: corn plant andMadagascar dragon tree.

Growers of this easy-care plant suggest not cutting it from the top, but you can remove the extra shoots from the stalk with a sharp knife. Cut it flush with the stalk if you don’t want another shoot to grow in the same place. If you do want a shoot to re-emerge, cut it about 1/8-inch out from the stalk. You can try to root the cut-off shoots in water: Dip the ends in rooting hormone powder and let them dry overnight, then place the shoots in water. Eventually, new roots may grow. You can grow lucky bamboo in water or in soil.

These are relatively low-maintenance plants, but you do need to pay attention to the water they’re in, and add water as it evaporates so the roots don’t dry out. Every week or so, pour out the old water and add fresh, preferably filtered water, or tap water that you have allowed to sit out overnight.

Keep lucky bamboo out of direct light and away from extreme heat or cold, and feed it every couple of months with a very dilute solution of plant food (about 1/10 the recommended strength, plant care specialists suggest).

 

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