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  • Garden events in Middle Tennessee

    Now - Sept. 7: Andy Warhol’s Flowers exhibit at Cheekwood. Nearly a dozen screen prints from the artist’s original Flowers series, paintings, studio photographs and more. Information: www.cheekwood.org.

    Sept. 4 and Sept. 6: Grow Your Own Medicine Chest workshop, a hands-on workshop to learn what herbs to grow and use for bites and stings, poison ivy, colds and other maladies. 6 - 8 p.m. Sept. 4; 10 a.m. – noon Sept. 6. $45 per person. To register and to learn more about other upcoming workshops, visit The Cracked Pot Homestead.

    Sept. 7: The Nashville African Violet Club will meet at 1:45 at Grace United Methodist Church, 2905 N. Mt. Juliet Rd. in Mount Juliet with a program on growing African violets.  For more information, contact Julie at  Julie.mavity@gmail.com or 615-364-8459.

    Sept. 14: The Tennessee Gesneriad Society will meet at 2 p.m. at Cheekwood in Botanic Hall. The program will be a presentation on interesting gesneriads to grow.  To learn more, contact Julie at  Julie.mavity@gmail.com or 615-364-8459.

     Sept 16: Perennial Plant Society meets at Cheekwood’s Botanic Hall. Guest speaker is Randy Hedgepath, state naturalist for Tennessee State Parks, topic is “Identifying Native Plants and Wildflowers.” www.ppsmt.org. Refreshments at  6:30, program at 7, open to the public.

    Sept. 16: Orchid Society of Middle Tennessee meets at Cheekwood’s Botanic Hall with guest speaker Geraldine Powell of Orchid Gallery. http://tnorchid.org/. Refreshments at  6:30, program at 7, open to the public.

    Sept. 18: Lunch & Lecture on “Ordinary Plants with Extraordinary Stories” with guest Carol Reese, ornamental horticulture specialist at UT Extension. Noon – 1 p.m. at Cheekwood. $15 for members, $25 for non-members. www.cheekwood.org.

    Sept. 20: Herb Day – “A Closer Look at Herbs,” sponsored by the Herb Society of Nashville, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m. in Cheekwood’s Botanic hall. $47 per person ($42 if you register by Aug. 31); registration is required. Details at www.herbsocietynashville.org.

    Sept. 25: Fall Wildflower Hike at Warner Park Nature Center. Stroll through a meadow with naturalist Deb Beazley to enjoy the array of fall wildflowers, 9 – 11 a.m. Another hike is scheduled Sept. 27, 9 – 11 a.m. Call 352-6299 to register for this adult-level program.

    Sept. 27: Cheekwood Harvest, a six-week festival celebrating fall, opens with activities and specialty programs throughout the gardens, including a display of more than 5,000 autumn-hued chrysanthemums in the Robertson Ellis Color Garden. Complete details and schedule are at www.cheekwood.org.

     

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Good luck with ‘bamboo’

QUESTION: I have a “lucky bamboo” plant in a pot of water with pebbles that looked great for awhile, but now it has grown big shoots out of each of the stalks. Can I cut off these shoots and re-pot them?

The first thing you need to know about lucky bamboo that it’s not bamboo at all, but a plant in the genus Dracaena (specifically, D. Sanderiana). Its close kin includes two other popular houseplants: corn plant andMadagascar dragon tree.

Growers of this easy-care plant suggest not cutting it from the top, but you can remove the extra shoots from the stalk with a sharp knife. Cut it flush with the stalk if you don’t want another shoot to grow in the same place. If you do want a shoot to re-emerge, cut it about 1/8-inch out from the stalk. You can try to root the cut-off shoots in water: Dip the ends in rooting hormone powder and let them dry overnight, then place the shoots in water. Eventually, new roots may grow. You can grow lucky bamboo in water or in soil.

These are relatively low-maintenance plants, but you do need to pay attention to the water they’re in, and add water as it evaporates so the roots don’t dry out. Every week or so, pour out the old water and add fresh, preferably filtered water, or tap water that you have allowed to sit out overnight.

Keep lucky bamboo out of direct light and away from extreme heat or cold, and feed it every couple of months with a very dilute solution of plant food (about 1/10 the recommended strength, plant care specialists suggest).

 

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