• Follow Me on Pinterest
  • Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

  • Garden events in Middle Tennessee

    May 2: Middle Tennessee Iris Society Show, Ed Jones Auditorium, Ellington Agricultural Center, 440 Hogan Road, 1:30 – 4:30 p.m. No charge for admission. The MTIS iris garden at Ellington is also open to visitors. www.middletnirisociety.org.

    May 2: Master Gardeners of Rutherford County 4th annual Plant and Seed Swap. Bring plants to swap with other gardeners in the community. There will also be displays and demonstrations, a silent auction, and Master Gardeners available to answer gardening questions at Lane Agri-Park in Murfreesboro, 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. www.mastergardeners-rc.org.

    May 3: Mid-State Iris Association’s annual Iris Show at Franklin Synergy Bank, 1 East College Street in Murfreesboro, 1:30 – 5 p.m. Open to the public with no admission charge.

    May 3: The Nashville African Violet Club will meet at 2 p.m. at Grace United Methodist Church, 2905 N. Mt. Juliet Rd, Mount Juliet. The program will be a propagation workshop. For more information, contact Julie at julie.mavity@gmail.com or 615-364-8459.

    May 9: Middle Tennessee Hosta Society’s annual hosta and companion plant sale, 8:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. at the YMCA Maryland Farms in Brentwood. The tentative plant list is available at www.mths-hosta.com.

    May 16: The Master Gardeners of Davidson County’s Urban Gardening Festival, 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. at the Demonstration Garden at Ellington Agricultural Center, 5201 Marchant Dr. Garden demonstrations, exhibitors, vendors from throughout the greater Nashville area. https://mgofdc.wildapricot.org

    May 17: The Tennessee Gesneriad Society will meet at Cheekwood in Botanic hall at 2 p.m. Frank Hale will discuss pests of indoor plants.  For more info contact Julie at julie.mavity@gmail.com or 615-364-8459.

    May 19: Perennial Plant Society meeting at Cheekwood’s Botanic Hall, refreshments at 6:30 p.m. and meeting begins at 7. Speaker is Linda Lanier of the Memphis Hydrangea Society. The event is open to the public.

    May 23 – 24: Nashville Rose Show, sponsored by the Nashville Rose Society, in Ed Jones Auditorium at Ellington Agricultural Center, 440 Hogan Road. The show will be open for public viewing 1 – 4:30 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Sunday. Seminars on growing roses will be held at 1:30 p.m. each day. The event is free. www.nashvillerosesociety.org.

  • Categories

  • Archives

No-fly zone

QUESTION: Some of the plants I brought in from outdoors seem to have tiny white flying bugs all around them, and are a nuisance. What are they? And what can I do about them?

 

Schefflera can play host to whiteflies.

These are likely whiteflies, and they often ride in on plants that spent summer outdoors. They’re more than a nuisance; they feed on the plant’s juices and can cause the leaves to turn yellow and die. The insects that are flying are the adults, and if you look at the undersides of the leaves you may be able to see the tiny yellow eggs and larvae.

Whiteflies feed on dozens of plant species and they reproduce quickly, so the problem could get out of hand quickly. To get rid of them, remove the badly infested leaves, then rinse the plant thoroughly and spray with an insecticidal soap. Be sure to treat the undersides of the leaves. Repeat the spraying every week or so.

Next fall, examine them closely to be sure there are no pests hitching a ride. Wash the leaves and treat the plants before you move them indoors. There are several other insect pests that you should watch for:

Aphids: they usually gather in clusters on tender young leaves. They also feed on a plant’s juices. Insecticidal soap, or washing with water or rubbing alcohol, is usually effective.

Mealybugs: You may see white, cottony clusters on stems or leaves, or where the leaf joins the stem. They also feed on the plants, so get rid of them by rubbing them off with water or alcohol.

Spider mites: They are barely visible, but you’ll certainly notice the damage – light-colored, speckled areas on top surfaces of leaves. You may see webbing stretching between leaves if there is a heavy infestation. Wash the plant with soapy water, and treat with insecticidal soap a day or two later. It may require diligence and several applications to control these insects.

UT Extension provides a booklet at its Web site that addresses these problems and more: Insects and Related Pests of House Plants (PB1157).

About these ads

One Response

  1. […] the plants that are overwintering indoors for whiteflies and other pests! About whiteflies: http://bit.ly/wW7nFvTwitterFacebook […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 95 other followers

%d bloggers like this: