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  • Garden events in Middle Tennessee

    July 5: The Nashville African Violet Club will meet at 2 p.m. at Grace United Methodist Church, 2905 N. Mt. Juliet Rd, Mount Juliet, TN 37122.  For more information, contact Julie at  Julie.mavity@gmail.com  or 615-364-8459.

    July 7: Nashville Rose Society meets at Cheekwood’s Botanic Hall, refreshments and beginners program at 6:30; main program begins at 7 p.m. Open to the public. www.nashvillerosesociety.com.

    July 9: Nashville Public Library Seed Exchange program, “Home Canning in 2015 – Be Safe and Successful,” 6 – 7:30 p.m. at the Green Hills Library. www.library.nashville.org/info/seedexchange.asp.

    July 11: Nashville Public Library Seed Exchange program, “What is Wrong With My Tomato Plants?” 10:30 a.m. – noon at the Main Library Conference Center. www.library.nashville.org/info/seedexchange.asp.

    July 12: The Tennessee Gesneriad Society will meet at 2 p.m. at Cheekwood, in Botanic Hall. The program will be a slide show of the international flower show from the Gesneriad Society convention.  For more info contact Julie at Julie.mavity@gmail.com or 615-364-8459.

    July 18: A Rotten Good Time! at Shelby Bottoms Nature Center. Learn how vegetable scraps from the kitchen garden can be turned into compost to use on plants in the garden. Christie Wiser leads this all-ages program. Call 615-862-8539 or email shelbybottomsnature@nashville.gov to register.

    July 18: Nashville Public Library Seed Exchange program, “Preparing Your Garden for Winter,” 10 – 11 a.m. at the Donelson Library. www.library.nashville.org/info/seedexchange.asp.

    July 18: Nashville Public Library Seed Exchange program, “Gardening with Native Plants with Margie Hunter,” 11 a.m., Goodlettsville Library. www.library.nashville.org/info/seedexchange.asp.

    July 21: Perennial Plant Society meets at Cheekwood’s Botanic Hall. Feature speaker is UT’s Carol Reese; topic is Four Seasons in the Garden, spotlighting seasonal favorites. Refreshments at 6:30 p.m., meeting begins at 7 and is open to all. www.ppsmt.org.

    July 22: Garden cooking at Warner Park Nature Center. Create a nutritious treat using the bountiful produce from the organic garden, 10 a.m. - noon. Nature Center staff leads this class for kids age 6 – 12. www.nashville.gov/Parks-and-Recreation.aspx.

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No-fly zone

QUESTION: Some of the plants I brought in from outdoors seem to have tiny white flying bugs all around them, and are a nuisance. What are they? And what can I do about them?

 

Schefflera can play host to whiteflies.

These are likely whiteflies, and they often ride in on plants that spent summer outdoors. They’re more than a nuisance; they feed on the plant’s juices and can cause the leaves to turn yellow and die. The insects that are flying are the adults, and if you look at the undersides of the leaves you may be able to see the tiny yellow eggs and larvae.

Whiteflies feed on dozens of plant species and they reproduce quickly, so the problem could get out of hand quickly. To get rid of them, remove the badly infested leaves, then rinse the plant thoroughly and spray with an insecticidal soap. Be sure to treat the undersides of the leaves. Repeat the spraying every week or so.

Next fall, examine them closely to be sure there are no pests hitching a ride. Wash the leaves and treat the plants before you move them indoors. There are several other insect pests that you should watch for:

Aphids: they usually gather in clusters on tender young leaves. They also feed on a plant’s juices. Insecticidal soap, or washing with water or rubbing alcohol, is usually effective.

Mealybugs: You may see white, cottony clusters on stems or leaves, or where the leaf joins the stem. They also feed on the plants, so get rid of them by rubbing them off with water or alcohol.

Spider mites: They are barely visible, but you’ll certainly notice the damage – light-colored, speckled areas on top surfaces of leaves. You may see webbing stretching between leaves if there is a heavy infestation. Wash the plant with soapy water, and treat with insecticidal soap a day or two later. It may require diligence and several applications to control these insects.

UT Extension provides a booklet at its Web site that addresses these problems and more: Insects and Related Pests of House Plants (PB1157).

One Response

  1. […] the plants that are overwintering indoors for whiteflies and other pests! About whiteflies: http://bit.ly/wW7nFvTwitterFacebook […]

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