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  • Garden events in Middle Tennessee

    July 22: Garden cooking at Warner Park Nature Center. Create a nutritious treat using the bountiful produce from the organic garden, 10 a.m. - noon. Nature Center staff leads this class for kids age 6 – 12. www.nashville.gov/Parks-and-Recreation.aspx.

    Aug. 1-2: Nashville Pond Society’s Parade of Ponds, a tour of water gardens at homes in East Nashville, Inglewood and Madison neighborhoods. Self-guided tours are 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Aug. 1, and noon – 5 p.m. Aug. 2. Tickets are $15 in advance, $20 on-site. www.nashvillepondsociety.org.

    Aug. 2: Nashville Tree Foundation’s Betty Brown Tree Trail and Arboretum community open house and tours, 1 – 5 p.m. at Riverfront Park. The event is in conjunction with the grand opening of the newly developed Riverfront Park and Ascend Amphitheater. Tours of the Tree Trail will be held every 20 minutes; meet Nashville Tree Foundation docents at the Tree Trail trailhead. Learn more at www.nashvilletreefoundation.org.

    Aug. 18: Perennial Plant Society meeting at Cheekwood’s Botanic Hall. Speaker is Shera Owen, topic is “People, Plants and their Stories.” Refreshments at 6:30 p.m., meeting at 7 p.m. open to the public. To learn more: http://www.ppsmt.org

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Good luck with ‘bamboo’

QUESTION: I have a “lucky bamboo” plant in a pot of water with pebbles that looked great for awhile, but now it has grown big shoots out of each of the stalks. Can I cut off these shoots and re-pot them?

The first thing you need to know about lucky bamboo that it’s not bamboo at all, but a plant in the genus Dracaena (specifically, D. Sanderiana). Its close kin includes two other popular houseplants: corn plant andMadagascar dragon tree.

Growers of this easy-care plant suggest not cutting it from the top, but you can remove the extra shoots from the stalk with a sharp knife. Cut it flush with the stalk if you don’t want another shoot to grow in the same place. If you do want a shoot to re-emerge, cut it about 1/8-inch out from the stalk. You can try to root the cut-off shoots in water: Dip the ends in rooting hormone powder and let them dry overnight, then place the shoots in water. Eventually, new roots may grow. You can grow lucky bamboo in water or in soil.

These are relatively low-maintenance plants, but you do need to pay attention to the water they’re in, and add water as it evaporates so the roots don’t dry out. Every week or so, pour out the old water and add fresh, preferably filtered water, or tap water that you have allowed to sit out overnight.

Keep lucky bamboo out of direct light and away from extreme heat or cold, and feed it every couple of months with a very dilute solution of plant food (about 1/10 the recommended strength, plant care specialists suggest).

 

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