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  • Upcoming Garden Events in Middle Tennessee

    March 1 – 4: Nashville Lawn & Garden Show, Fairgrounds Nashville: The annual all-indoors garden event that features live garden displays, lectures, vendors, floral designs and special programming Wine Festival featuring Tennessee wines is Saturday (March 3), noon – 5 p.m. For more information on the events and the complete lecture schedule, visit www.nashvillelawnandgardenshow.com.

    April 7: Perennial Plant Sale hosted by the Perennial Plant Society of Middle Tennessee annual Perennial Plant Sale at The Fairgrounds Nashville. Find newly released and hard-to-find perennials along with a wide range of tried and tested varieties, all from top local nurseries. The sale opens at 9 a.m. and usually sells out by early afternoon. For more information, visit www.ppsmtn.org.

    April 14: Herb & Plant Sale hosted by The Herb Society of 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., at The Fairgrounds Nashville Sports Arena building. The sale offers common and rare varieties of herbs and heirloom vegetables and handmade pottery and herb markers by artist Roy Overcast for sale. For more information and a list of available plants, visit www.herbsocietynashville.org.

    April 21: Herb & Craft Fair hosted by First Unitarian Universalist Church of Nashville, 1808 Woodmont Blvd., 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Top quality perennial and annual herbs, heirloom tomato plants, native and companion plants, along with food and craft items reflecting an interest in the homemade and homegrown: fresh homemade sweet and yeast breads, spice mixes, barbecue sauces, jams and jellies; knitted and sewn items, homes for birds and bees, and art, jewelry and more made from pressed flowers. Visit www.thefuun.org.

    May 12: Hosta sale hosted by the Middle Tennessee Hosta. Proceeds from the sale support the club’s activities. More information about the MTHS is at www.mths-hosta.com.

    May 19: Urban Gardening Festival, hosted by Master Gardeners of Davidson County, 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. (rain or shine) at the Master Gardeners’ Demonstration Garden at Ellington Agricultural Center (5201 Marchant Drive in Nashville). The free event includes information about a variety of gardening methods and techniques, local artisans, exhibiters, growers and more. For information, visit www.mgofdc.org/ugf.

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What’s bugging the squash?

QUESTION: The leaves on some of my squash plants are beginning to wilt. Some of the small squash are rotting. What’s the reason?

squash gbWhen summer squash plants begin to go bad, you can probably blame it on insect pests. Two likely culprits: the squash bug and the squash vine borer.

“When squash leaves wilt and collapse, the squash bug is usually the pest to blame,” says extension agent David Cook. Squash bugs lay small, bronze-colored eggs on the undersides and upper surfaces of the leaves. Nymphs are gray with black legs, and are usually found in groups; adult squash bugs are broad and flat. They pierce the leaves and remove the sap, leaving the leaves wilted. You may also find them on cucumbers, melons and pumpkins.

The best control method is to be on the lookout for the eggs early in the season, and remove any that you find on the plants. (Organic Gardening magazine’s online pest control center suggests gently squishing them before they have a chance to hatch, and squishing any nymphs you may find, as
squash bug eggswell.) If you feel you must spray something, Cook says insecticides labeled for squash bug include bifenthrin, or permethrin. Always read and follow label directions.

If a long branch of the plant — or the entire plant — wilts suddenly, it’s the work of the squash vine borer, the larva of a moth that lays her eggs on the leaf stalks and vines. The eggs hatch in about a week, and the larva bores into the stem of the plant and begins to feed. If you look closely, you may find sawdust-like material near the base of the plant. To try to save the vine, split the stem open and remove the caterpillar. Mound soil up around the wound to encourage roots to grow.

After the larva enters the stem, insecticides are ineffective, so if you choose to use a chemical treatment, you have to start early. Cook says insecticides labeled for squash vine borer include bifenthrin, permethrin, carbaryl and esfenvalerate, and spinosad, which is considered a natural insecticide. Again, be sure to follow label instructions.




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