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  • Upcoming Garden Events in Middle Tennessee

    March 1 – 4: Nashville Lawn & Garden Show, Fairgrounds Nashville. The annual all-indoors garden event that features live garden displays, lectures, vendors, floral designs and special programming Wine Festival featuring Tennessee wines is Saturday (March 3), noon – 5 p.m. For more information on the events and the complete lecture schedule, visit www.nashvillelawnandgardenshow.com.

    April 7: Perennial Plant Sale hosted by the Perennial Plant Society of Middle Tennessee  at The Fairgrounds Nashville. Find newly released and hard-to-find perennials along with a wide range of tried and tested varieties, all from top local nurseries. The sale opens at 9 a.m. and usually sells out by early afternoon. For more information, visit www.ppsmtn.org.

    April 14: Herb & Plant Sale hosted by The Herb Society of Nashville, 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., at The Fairgrounds Nashville Sports Arena building. The sale offers common and rare varieties of herbs and heirloom vegetables and handmade pottery and herb markers by artist Roy Overcast for sale. For more information and a list of available plants, visit herbsocietynashville.org.

    May 12: Hosta sale hosted by the Middle Tennessee Hosta Society. Proceeds from the sale support the club’s activities. More information about the MTHS is at www.mths-hosta.com.

    May 19: Urban Gardening Festival hosted by Master Gardeners of Davidson County, 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. at the Master Gardeners’ Demonstration Garden at Ellington Agricultural Center (5201 Marchant Drive in Nashville). The free event includes information about a variety of gardening methods and techniques, local artisans, exhibits, growers and more. For information, visit www.mgofdc.org/ugf.

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Pampas grass has lost its plumes

Our pampas grass has been beautiful for ten years, but this year it did not produce the feathery plumes. What could be the problem?

Pampas grassThere are several possible reasons pampas grass (Cortaderia selloana) doesn’t produce the tall, graceful plumes that we look forward to in late summer. One of the most common seems to be overfertilization. If the grass is near a lawn that was heavily fertilized with nitrogen, it could have affected the plumes. Nitrogen fertilizer tends to grow a lot of greenery at the expense of flowers – or plumes, in the case of ornamental grass.

It may also be due to too little phosphorous in the soil. A soil test can provide the answer, and if it turns out to be a phosphorous deficiency, you can add bone meal to the planting bed. Some sources also say that young clumps of pampas grass may not plume for the first couple of years.

In general, pampas grass grows best in full sun and well-drained soil. It’s a good idea to cut the grass (and all ornamental grasses) back every year in late winter before new growth begins. Wear sturdy gloves (pampas grass’s sawtooth leaves can cut you!) and use hedge trimmers or shears to cut the clump to within about a foot of the ground. Over time, grass that is not cut may die out in the center – one more thing that might affect the formation of the tall, graceful plumes.

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