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  • March garden tips & tasks

    If your fescue lawn looks a little skimpy, overseed early this month. Fescue grows best when the weather is still cool.

    Clip dead stems from perennial herbs – thyme, sage, lavender, rosemary. Pruning encourages vigorous new growth.

    Prune nandinas, flowering quince and other airy shrubs by reaching in and removing about a third of the branches at ground level.

    Remove mulch or leaves that may be covering perennials in garden beds.

    Prepare a new garden bed: Have the soil tested (check with your county’s Extension service). Remove grass and dig or till soil 8 to 10 inches deep and mix with soil amendments and organic matter to improve drainage.

    Add fertilizer lightly to perennials as soon as you see new growth. Too much fertilizer may result in lanky growth.

    Herb transplants that don’t mind cool weather -- parsley, cilantro, sage, oregano – can go in the ground now.

    When you cut daffodils to bring inside, cut the stems at an angle and place them in water right away. Change the water in the vase daily to keep them fresh longer.

    Save the date - Middle Tennessee garden events

    The Perennial Plant Society's annual Plant Sale will be April 8, opening at 9 a.m. at The Fairgrounds Nashville. The sale offers newly released and hard-to-find perennials from top local nurseries -- more than 450 varieties of perennials, vines, grasses, shrubs and annuals. The event supports local scholarships for Tennessee horticulture students and monthly gardening programs, open to the public, at Cheekwood Botanical Gardens. For information visit www.ppsmtn.org.

    The Herb Society of Nashville's annual Herb Sale will be April 29, 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. at The Fairgrounds Nashville. The sale will offer heirloom vegetables, rare varieties of perennial and annual herbs, handmade pottery herb markers and more. To learn more, visit herbsocietynashville.org.

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Azaleas thrive when conditions are right

Question: Our azaleas on the eastern side of the house have never been very showy. The flowers are always puny and short-lived. This year one plant’s leaves are quite yellow. Is this is sign of disease or need for fertilizer? Any advice on helping the plants do better?

AzaleaFirst, consider what azaleas need to grow well, and you may find that one or more of these conditions (outlined by the Azalea Society of America) is not being met:

-Slightly acid soil (pH 5.5 – 6; a soil test can provide that information about the soil in your azalea bed).

-Enough sunlight. Less than 3 hours of sun reduces the number of buds.

-Adequate moisture. Like many other shrubs and perennials in the garden, azaleas need about an inch of water (rainfall or watering) per week. Mulch around the shrubs can help the soil retain moisture.

There are several factors that affect the number of blooms — including the fact that some are just “shy bloomers,” according to the Azalea Society. Lack of moisture during late spring and summer also affect bud formation, or there may be a phosphorous deficiency (again, the soil test can determine if that’s the case).

As for those yellow leaves: If the yellowing is between dark green veins, the condition is called chlorosis, which is usually caused by an iron deficiency, alkalinity of the soil, potassium, calcium or magnesium deficiency, or too much phosphorous. Iron sulfate or sulfur can acidify the soil.

Leaves that are uniformly a yellow – green color may just need more nitrogen. That soil test should be your first step to determine what the problem may be.

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2 Responses

  1. Great Info. I’m sharing…. 🙂 Happy Spring

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