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  • Upcoming Garden Events in Middle Tennessee

    March 1 – 4: Nashville Lawn & Garden Show, Fairgrounds Nashville: The annual all-indoors garden event that features live garden displays, lectures, vendors, floral designs and special programming Wine Festival featuring Tennessee wines is Saturday (March 3), noon – 5 p.m. For more information on the events and the complete lecture schedule, visit www.nashvillelawnandgardenshow.com.

    April 7: Perennial Plant Sale hosted by the Perennial Plant Society of Middle Tennessee annual Perennial Plant Sale at The Fairgrounds Nashville. Find newly released and hard-to-find perennials along with a wide range of tried and tested varieties, all from top local nurseries. The sale opens at 9 a.m. and usually sells out by early afternoon. For more information, visit www.ppsmtn.org.

    April 14: Herb & Plant Sale hosted by The Herb Society of 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., at The Fairgrounds Nashville Sports Arena building. The sale offers common and rare varieties of herbs and heirloom vegetables and handmade pottery and herb markers by artist Roy Overcast for sale. For more information and a list of available plants, visit www.herbsocietynashville.org.

    April 21: Herb & Craft Fair hosted by First Unitarian Universalist Church of Nashville, 1808 Woodmont Blvd., 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Top quality perennial and annual herbs, heirloom tomato plants, native and companion plants, along with food and craft items reflecting an interest in the homemade and homegrown: fresh homemade sweet and yeast breads, spice mixes, barbecue sauces, jams and jellies; knitted and sewn items, homes for birds and bees, and art, jewelry and more made from pressed flowers. Visit www.thefuun.org.

    May 12: Hosta sale hosted by the Middle Tennessee Hosta. Proceeds from the sale support the club’s activities. More information about the MTHS is at www.mths-hosta.com.

    May 19: Urban Gardening Festival, hosted by Master Gardeners of Davidson County, 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. (rain or shine) at the Master Gardeners’ Demonstration Garden at Ellington Agricultural Center (5201 Marchant Drive in Nashville). The free event includes information about a variety of gardening methods and techniques, local artisans, exhibiters, growers and more. For information, visit www.mgofdc.org/ugf.

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Flowers now, tomatoes later

I remember reading somewhere about removing the early blooms on the tomato plants. Is this recommended?

tomato blossomThe general consensus is no, you don’t need to remove the early flowers of tomatoes, but there are two or three sides to the question. Some say to remove any blooms that may be on tomato transplants before you put them in the ground; some say to remove the first flowers after transplanting. The reason for pinching off any flowers at all would be to allow a very young transplant to focus on developing into a stronger plant before it puts energy into fruit production. But most resources (and all homegrown-tomato gardeners I’ve talked to) say it’s not necessary to remove the flowers at all.

There is also discussion about whether the tomato is a determinate variety (in which the tomatoes set fruit, ripen and are harvested all at once) or indeterminate (they ripen throughout the summer, until frost). If the tomato is a determinate variety, there’s a chance that you reduce the ultimate size of the crop if you pinch off the flowers. In general, there is no need to remove the flowers of either type if they are sturdy plants.

It is usually recommended to remove the suckers that grow as the plant grows. These are the shoots that grow from an axil, that point where a branch grows out of the stem. Removing them helps keep the plant more compact.

Making their debut: New shrub varieties

Last year I was invited to sample some new varieties of shrubs from Proven Winners® ColorChoice® that are making their debut in garden centers this year. They’ve been growing for a year in my garden now. Click over to the garden journal, Turning Toward the Sun, to see how they’re doing.

June Garden calendar

It’s the month for daylilies in Middle Tennessee, and the Middle Tennessee Daylily Society is holding its annual show and sale later this month. Find the June Garden Calendar listing this month’s garden events, tips and tasks at Tennessean.com.

 

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