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  • Upcoming Garden Events

    Sept. 30: The Nashville Herb Society presents Through the Garden Gate: A Glimpse of Edwardian England, 8 a.m. – 3 p.m. at Cheekwood Botanic Hall. Celebrate the gardens, foods and flowers that delighted Downton Abby family and friends at the turn of the 20th century. The event begins with a hearty Edwardian breakfast, followed by three speakers: Marta McDowell on Beatrix Potter’s Gardening Life; Geraldine A. Laufer on Tussie Mussie – Victorian art of expressing yourself in the language of flowers; and Terry White, The English Garden event florist . Registration includes breakfast, box lunch in the garden with music, English tea and cookies. To learn more or to register, visit www.herbsocietynashvlle.org.

    Tips & tasks – September

    Cut the dead tops of coneflowers, but leave enough for goldfinches to enjoy the seeds.

    Plant cool-weather vegetables for a fall crop: spinach, mustard and turnip greens, radishes, leaf lettuce.

    Start a new lawn of cool-season grass, such as fescue, or refurbish or repair establish lawns.

    Don’t let the soil of newly planted grass dry out. New grass needs about an inch of water per week.

    It’s still warm, so continue to water and weed garden beds as needed.

    Remove dead foliage, spent flowers and other garden debris; replenish mulch as needed.

    Continue to harvest produce, which may be getting a boost now from slightly cooler weather. Keep watering sage, rosemary and other perennial herbs so they’ll be in good shape to get through winter.

    Prepare to bring houseplants back indoors: remove dead leaves, scrub soil from the sides of the pots, treat for insects. Bring tropical plants in before nighttime temperatures dip to 55 degrees.

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Holes in your hostas? Suspect slugs

The hostas in my shade garden are ragged and full of holes every year at the end of summer. Is this normal?

HostaIt’s not unusual to find holes in big, leafy hostas. Those large, wide leaves create a cool, moist shelter for slugs and snails, who may rest under them during the heat of the day and come out at night to dine. You can verify their presence by placing a small board beside the hostas where you’ve noticed damaged leaves. In the morning, turn the board over to see how many have gathered on the underside of the board. Dispose of them as you wish. Another option may be to set out a small dish or a shallow aluminum can (such as a tuna or cat food can) filled with beer beside the hostas. Slugs in the area may be lured by the beer to crawl into the can, and you can dump them all in the trash.

The American Hosta Society suggests several solutions for protecting plants from slug damage, one of which is to provide something else for them to eat, such as lettuce. A different strategy focuses on placing a barrier around vulnerable plants. Strips of copper on the ground can be effective because slugs don’t like to cross it; diatomaceous earth or table salt sprinkled around the plants also may keep them away, but be careful about adding too much salt to the soil.

The American Hosta Society mentions a couple of poison baits, but also suggests that a 10% solution of vinegar, sprayed on the slugs, stops them in their tracks – but you have to be out there with the spray when they are out, which is usually at night.

A final suggestion is to set a trap. Place two boards together with a small stick between them, where the slugs can crawl into the cool shade. Then, when the slugs are between the boards, remove the stick to trap and dispose of them.

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The Nashville Tree Foundation announces the opening of the Betty Brown Tree Trail and Arboretum, a leafy respite next to the newly developed Riverfront Park and Ascend Amphitheater in downtown Nashville. The meandering trail, Named after

Betty Brown

Betty Moorhead Brown

NTF’s founding board member and first president, the late Betty Moorhead Brown, includes 236 trees representing 36 different species. A dedication ceremony is planned for later this month, but Nashville Public Television’s Volunteer Gardener program has already taped a segment at the Trail. The segment will air on Sept. 17 at 7:30 p.m. and again on Sept. 20 at 9:30 a.m.

For visitors to the Trail, Nashville Tree Foundation has developed a guide pamphlet that lists the tree species and what to look for along the way. When you visit, pick up a pamphlet at the visitor’s kiosk, or download it here at NTF’s website.

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In The Tennessean — Easy design with herbs: Floral designer Ralph Null has a simple rule for arranging flowers: “My whole approach is what I call easy design.” He will be among the speakers at the Herb Society of Nashville’s annual Herb Day on Sept. 19, and offers tips for using herbs in floral designs in a story in Saturday’s Tennessean.

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