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  • Upcoming Garden Events in Middle Tennessee

    March 1 – 4: Nashville Lawn & Garden Show, Fairgrounds Nashville: The annual all-indoors garden event that features live garden displays, lectures, vendors, floral designs and special programming Wine Festival featuring Tennessee wines is Saturday (March 3), noon – 5 p.m. For more information on the events and the complete lecture schedule, visit www.nashvillelawnandgardenshow.com.

    April 7: Perennial Plant Sale hosted by the Perennial Plant Society of Middle Tennessee annual Perennial Plant Sale at The Fairgrounds Nashville. Find newly released and hard-to-find perennials along with a wide range of tried and tested varieties, all from top local nurseries. The sale opens at 9 a.m. and usually sells out by early afternoon. For more information, visit www.ppsmtn.org.

    April 14: Herb & Plant Sale hosted by The Herb Society of 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., at The Fairgrounds Nashville Sports Arena building. The sale offers common and rare varieties of herbs and heirloom vegetables and handmade pottery and herb markers by artist Roy Overcast for sale. For more information and a list of available plants, visit www.herbsocietynashville.org.

    April 21: Herb & Craft Fair hosted by First Unitarian Universalist Church of Nashville, 1808 Woodmont Blvd., 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Top quality perennial and annual herbs, heirloom tomato plants, native and companion plants, along with food and craft items reflecting an interest in the homemade and homegrown: fresh homemade sweet and yeast breads, spice mixes, barbecue sauces, jams and jellies; knitted and sewn items, homes for birds and bees, and art, jewelry and more made from pressed flowers. Visit www.thefuun.org.

    May 12: Hosta sale hosted by the Middle Tennessee Hosta. Proceeds from the sale support the club’s activities. More information about the MTHS is at www.mths-hosta.com.

    May 19: Urban Gardening Festival, hosted by Master Gardeners of Davidson County, 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. (rain or shine) at the Master Gardeners’ Demonstration Garden at Ellington Agricultural Center (5201 Marchant Drive in Nashville). The free event includes information about a variety of gardening methods and techniques, local artisans, exhibiters, growers and more. For information, visit www.mgofdc.org/ugf.

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Water worries for houseplants

Question: I use tap water to water all my houseplants, but I’ve heard that’s not always a good idea. What difference does it make?

peace-lily-2Most people don’t think about the water they use to water houseplants —  just turn on the tap and fill the watering can. But what’s in your tap water may make a difference in how your plants grow.

Garden author Barbara Pleasant talks about water problems in her book, The Complete Houseplant Survival Manual. She says most plants prefer “soft” water, which contains low amounts of calcium and magnesium salts, over “hard” water, which contains high amounts of these elements. Water softeners remove the mineral salts through filtration or magnetization, but the water still contains high levels of salt, she says. This could lead to problems when it is used to water plants. Continue reading

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For houseplants, go easy on the water

Question: I’m told I’ve been over-watering our houseplants, yet we have sprigs of plants rooting in jars in nothing but water. How can a plant be over-watered when it can also be rooted and flourish in water? And how do you know when you’re watering too much?

Snake plant

Snake plant – Sansevieria trifasciata

Houseplant experts agree that over-watering can have a detrimental effect on houseplants. Soil that stays too wet causes the plant’s roots to rot, and invites fungi that thrive in moist conditions. That’s why it’s important to grow houseplants in pots with adequate drainage, and to allow the soil of most plants to dry between waterings.Different houseplants also have different water requirements, and many need less water in winter when they are growing more slowly. Before you add water, poke a finger into the soil, and only water the plant if it feels dry. Or push a wooden chopstick into the soil, and if it’s not damp when you pull it out, water the plant. It is better for a plant to have too little water than too much, but you also want to make sure it doesn’t wilt.

As for plants rooting in water: many fleshy plants will quickly develop roots in plain water and can later be planted in soil. Ideally, as the roots develop, the water is kept clean by being changed frequently. But if they are kept in water long enough, even those plants that seem to thrive for awhile will eventually lose vigor and may rot, too.

Houseplants’ soft water secrets

Question: Our home has a central water purification/softening system. Is this water good to use on houseplants? Or is it better to use water not connected to the system?

heart leaf philodendronMost people don’t think about the water they use to water houseplants —  just turn on the tap and fill the watering can. But what’s in your tap water can make a difference in how your plants grow.

Garden author Barbara Pleasant talks about water problems in her book, The Complete Houseplant Survival Manual. She says most plants prefer “soft” water, which contains low amounts of calcium and magnesium salts, instead of “hard” water, which contains high amounts of these elements. Water softeners remove the mineral salts through filtration or magnetization, but the water still contains high levels of salt, she says. This could lead to problems when it is used to water plants.

Pleasant suggests using rainwater or bottled distilled water, which are naturally soft, on your indoor plants.

The mineral salts in tap water are only one thing to consider. Plants may also be sensitive to too much chlorine, which is added to tap water to prevent bacteria, and some plants, including palms and dracaenas, are sensitive to fluoride.

To solve the problem of too much chlorine, allow the water to sit out overnight, so that chlorine and other chemicals escape into the air. If you suspect fluoride may be causing a problem (browing leaf tips on plants may be a clue), it may help to add a pinch of lime on the surface of the pot every few months, Pleasant advises. “This helps raise the pH of the soil, which makes the fluoride more soluble in water.

One other watering tip: whatever the source of the water, make sure it’s at room temperature when you water your plants. Drenching a houseplant in icy water chills the roots, which can cause them to rot, Pleasant says.

The drought takes a toll on trees

QUESTION:  I have a concern about two hackberry trees in my yard. They are quite old and beautiful, but the leaves are turning yellow and are falling off rapidly.  Is this due to the high heat or another problem? I would sincerely hate to see these lovely trees die.  

During drought, a hackberry’s leaves may turn yellow and fall. Mature, healthy trees should recover.

Let’s just say that while the high heat is a major culprit in the early-summer yellowing of a lot of things, it’s not acting alone. “It’s drought primarily,” says Alan Windham, the ornamental and turfgrass pathology expert at U.T. Extension.

“I actually witnessed this, this morning on hackberry behind my home while walking my dogs,” he said when I sent him this question earlier this week. “It was breezy, and yellow leaves were falling from the hackberry like a fall day.”

Most likely, this leaf-fall is not a fatal condition. “Most mature trees have survived many droughts, and should be able to survive this one,”Windham said. “Regardless, I’m hoping for rain this week.”

Young trees that haven’t had a chance to develop an extensive root system are more vulnerable. An email alert from the Nashville Tree Foundation, which plants trees in public places and private yards on its ReLeafing day each November, has sent an alert with watering guidelines and new tips that you can read here to help young trees survive. Most important: water thoroughly, and water slowly to prevent run-off.

The long-range weather forecast may show some relief. Next week, it looks like temperatures will be in the more reasonable mid-to-upper 80s, with a chance of rain.

 

Keep African violets blooming

QUESTION: My African violets were blooming beautifully when I got them a few months ago, but no longer. How can I get them to bloom again?

It’s easy to love those dainty clusters of blossoms rising from rosettes of downy leaves. African violets look like they’d be fussy plants, but quite the opposite: “They’re easy to grow if you know a few secrets,” says Julie Mavity-Hudson of the Nashville African Violet Club.

One of those secrets may surprise you: African violets tend to bloom better when they’re slightly root-bound, so don’t rush to move them to larger pots. They thrive in bright, indirect light and average room temperatures, in soil that is kept slightly moist. “The thing that kills more African violets than anything is overwatering,” Mavity-Hudson says.

Failure to bloom might be because the plant is not getting enough light. In winter, when the light is low, try moving it to a south or west window where the light is brighter, but move it away from the window when the light is more intense. Direct sun will burn the leaves of African violets.

A light feeding of high-phosphorous plant food every few weeks may also help. Houseplant expert Barbara Pleasant (The Complete Houseplant Survival Manual) suggests adding a light pinch of Epsom salts to water to push balky plants into bloom.

To get together with other African violet aficionados, check out the Nashville African Violet Club, which meets the first Sunday of most months,1:45, at the Green Hill Women’s Center,10905 Lebanon Road in Mt. Juliet. The meetings are open to the public.

 

Just water, please

Last summer, when it was very hot, I ran my dehumidifer upstairs when it was impossible to cool and used the water to water my indoor plants. Within a week or so they perked up like they were new plants, so I’m wondering how to duplicate that water, or what do you suggest? I have tried plant food, tea water, etc. and nothing works like the water from my dehumidfier. -S.W.

Houseplants may benefit from water that is free of added chemicals.

A likely explanation might be that since the water in a dehumidifier is “collected” from the air, nothing has been added — no chlorine or fluoride, such as we have in tap water. A lot of houseplants are sensitive to the additives in tap water, especially fluoride, according to my favorite source on caring for houseplants, author Barbara Pleasant’s Compete Houseplant Survival Manual.

You may be able to duplicate that unadulterated water by letting tap water sit out overnight before watering plants with it; supposedly that allows the chlorine and other chemicals in the water to escape. Or you could try using distilled water, or collect rainwater to use on your plants.

The author goes on to suggest using water that is at room temperature when you give it to the plants. “Giving cold water to tropical plants chills their roots, which can cause them to rot,” she writes.”