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    Save the Date: Perennial Plant Society’s 30th Plant Sale is April 4, 2020, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. at the new Expo 3 Building at The Fairgrounds Nashville. Here’s where you can find the newest varieties of perennials, shrubs, vines and annuals from local growers, along with long-time, never-fail favorites, ready for spring planting. Learn more at the PPS website.

     

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When will Siberian irises bloom?

Question: I received several clumps of Siberian irises from a friend last spring. I didn’t plant them right away, but when I finally did plant, I watered them well and added some fertilizer. They looked a bit limp for awhile and finally recovered, but they didn’t bloom. Should I expect blooms this year?

siberian irisIrises are among the season’s loveliest flowers. The big, beautiful bearded irises that are putting on such a show right now seem to be unconcerned about when and how often they’re moved and usually bloom without fussing. But according to the American Iris Society, Siberian irises don’t like to be disturbed once they’re established, so they may sulk for awhile when they’re moved. If the roots dried while they were waiting to be planted, that may have dealt them another blow. AIS cautions that the roots should never be allowed to dry out while they are out of the ground, and they should be watered heavily after they are transplanted.

Last year, the newly planted irises may have spent the spring and summer getting a strong root system established. By this year, you may have a few blooms.

In general, here is what Siberian irises need to do well: slightly acidic soil in a sunny location (though AIS says they can tolerate light shade), and regular moisture. While the rhizomes of bearded irises should be planted almost on top of the soil, Siberian and other beardless varieties should be set slightly deeper in the ground. All beardless irises should be fertilized regularly.

What’s blooming indoors? Gloxinia

QUESTION: A friend gave me a gloxinia with purple and white flowers as a Christmas gift, and told me it’s a houseplant that’s easy to grow. How should I take care of it?

Sinningia ‘Peridots Darth Vader’ . Photo courtesy Tennessee Gesneriad Society

Sinningia ‘Peridots Darth Vader’ . Photo courtesy Tennessee Gesneriad Society

Gloxinia is in the plant family of gesneriads, a family that includes hundreds of tropical blooming plants. Many of them have found favor as houseplants – including their more familiar cousins, African violets.Florist gloxinias (Sinningia is the botanical name) are favored for their showy, trumpet-shaped flowers and velvety leaves. They need sufficient light to grow and bloom well, says Julie Mavity-Hudson of the Tennessee Gesneriad Society, so placing them near a south-facing window with filtered light (not direct sun) is ideal. If that’s not an option in your home, you may be able to provide the light they require to bloom by placing them under a two-tube fluorescent fixture. Gloxinias do best in average room temperature, with the soil kept moderately moist.

While they have been grown as perennial plants that die back and return after a period of dormancy, it’s good to know that most gloxinias from florists and retailers are hybrids that are grown as annuals, bred to be showy for awhile but not long-lived – a brief but lovely life. The bloom period may last about two months, then the plant will begin to fade, so don’t be disappointed that it may soon look ready for the compost bin.

And if you want to explore more about the family of gesneriads, check out the Gesneriad Society web site to learn more about these beautiful and unusual plants.