• Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

  • Upcoming events in Middle Tennessee

     

    Save the Date: Perennial Plant Society’s 30th Plant Sale is April 4, 2020, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. at the new Expo 3 Building at The Fairgrounds Nashville. Here’s where you can find the newest varieties of perennials, shrubs, vines and annuals from local growers, along with long-time, never-fail favorites, ready for spring planting. Learn more at the PPS website.

     

  • Categories

  • Archives

Hanging plants look like home to wrens

Birds have built nests in our hanging ferns. I have tried putting plastic snakes in the pots, but they only build on top of them! Any suggestions for keeping them from building in the hanging pots?

Carolina wrens sometimes nest in ferns and other hanging plants.

Carolina wrens sometimes nest in ferns and other hanging plants.

The birds making a home in your ferns are most likely Carolina wrens, cute little brown birds that eat insects – and lots of them – and feed them to their babies, say bird experts at Wild Birds Unlimited. And there is really not much you can do, since as far as they can tell, you’ve put out the welcome mat and invited them in. The birds are taking advantage of the foliage to provide cover for their nests, and they’re too smart to be scared away by fake snakes.

Continue to water the plants as usual (trying to avoid the nest if you can) and the plants should continue to do well.

The cure for overgrown pothos

QUESTION: My pothos in a hanging basket spent the summer outdoors in the shade this summer. When I brought it in, I discovered the stems had grown very long but most of the leaves are near the ends, and the stems are bare in the middle. Will it hurt to cut the stems back?

pothos 2Pothos is a popular, easy-to-grow houseplant. It won’t hurt to cut the stems back; in fact, houseplant experts recommend giving them a trim every now and then to keep the plants bushy and full.

Pothos may be the perfect houseplant for anyone who says they can’t keep a houseplant alive. It does best in moderate to bright light and a moderate amount of water, but is tolerant if you forget to water it. In fact, it prefers soil that is on the dry side over soggy soil. If it stays too wet, the leaves may turn yellow and drop off. Houseplant expert and author Barbara Pleasant notes that if pothos grows in very low light, the stems grow longer with more space between the leaves.

To help the plants fill out again, cut the bare stems to within 2 inches of the soil, or cut stems above a leaf node (where the leaf emerges from the stem). These cut-off stem tips can be rooted in water, and the rooted cuttings can be potted in regular potting soil.