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  • Upcoming events in Middle Tennessee

     

    Save the Date: Perennial Plant Society’s 30th Plant Sale is April 4, 2020, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. at the new Expo 3 Building at The Fairgrounds Nashville. Here’s where you can find the newest varieties of perennials, shrubs, vines and annuals from local growers, along with long-time, never-fail favorites, ready for spring planting. Learn more at the PPS website.

     

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Leave gladiolus in the ground?

We planted gladiolus in the ground and in containers this summer. I’ve heard they need to be dug up and stored over the winter. Really?

glads orange garden benchGladiolus are tender summer-flowering plants that grow from corms, and where you live will probably determine whether to dig them up or not. Here in Middle Tennessee (Zone 7a), the recommendation from the University of Tennessee Extension is to dig up and dry the corms after the foliage dies back and before a heavy frost, but the truth is, most gardeners I talk to here leave the corms in the ground and they usually survive.

In colder areas, they should be dug and stored. The Web site of the Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service (in Indiana) for example, says that gladiolus corms should be dug after frost. Dig the corms by loosening the soil so that you can pull the plant out of the ground. Shake off the loose soil and allow the corms to dry in the sun for a day or two. Cut the foliage off 1 – 2 inches above the corms and store them in a cool, dry place.

Plant the corms again after the soil has warmed up, in late April or May. By planting in two-week intervals between May and July, you can have a succession of blooms for several weeks beginning about mid-summer.

Protect banana trees from the cold

'Texas Star' banana. Photo by Dave G.

‘Texas Star’ banana. Photo by Dave G.

We planted a new ‘Texas Star’ banana tree this spring. It’s growing and looks great, but how do we protect it this winter? We live in Middle Tennessee, and it is planted in an open area near a pool.

The ‘Texas Star’ banana is said to be a cold-hardy variety, but it still needs coddling over the winter here in Zone 7a, where temperatures regularly fall below freezing. Once they’re exposed to a couple of frosty nights, the leaves will be reduced to a wilted mush. The important thing is to protect the underground rhizomes. The University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture grows an impressive Hardy Banana in the UT Gardens in Knoxville, and provides this information for overwintering a banana plant:

Just before frost is expected, use a clean, sharp saw to cut the stems and leaves down to about 8 – 10 inches above the ground, then pile a thick layer of mulch over the crown. They say it’s best to use a heavy mulch (pine bark or hardwood), which won’t blow away easily. Others suggest you cover the stump with the leaves you cut from the plant, or wrap the stump with a blanket, and cover it with an overturned plastic garbage can.

In the spring, remove the mulch after the danger of frost is past, and the rhizome will send up new shoots and grow rapidly when the weather has warmed.

By the way, in this area banana trees are grown for their exotic foliage; it takes a long time to grow bananas, and summer here just isn’t long enough (though if you’ve grown bananas here in Zone 7a, I’d love to hear from you!).