• Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

  • Upcoming events in Middle Tennessee

     

    Save the Date: Perennial Plant Society’s 30th Plant Sale is April 4, 2020, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. at the new Expo 3 Building at The Fairgrounds Nashville. Here’s where you can find the newest varieties of perennials, shrubs, vines and annuals from local growers, along with long-time, never-fail favorites, ready for spring planting. Learn more at the PPS website.

     

  • Categories

  • Archives

May garden tips & tasks

May is a busy and beautiful time in the garden. Here are tasks and tips to keep you busy this month.

Early in the month

If you haven’t already gotten those warm-season vegetables in the ground, plant them now! Tomatoes, peppers, squash, okra, beans, eggplant and other favorites will get off to a fast start now that the weather is warm.

zinnias-1

Set out bedding plants of zinnias and other summer annuals.

Set out bedding plants of zinnias, celosia, snapdragon, begonias, petunias, coleus – all the favorite summer annuals.

Plant plenty of basil in a sunny location to use in summer recipes. Clip and use it frequently, which allows the plants to grow sturdier. Snip off flowers as they begin to form. Continue reading

Leave gladiolus in the ground?

We planted gladiolus in the ground and in containers this summer. I’ve heard they need to be dug up and stored over the winter. Really?

glads orange garden benchGladiolus are tender summer-flowering plants that grow from corms, and where you live will probably determine whether to dig them up or not. Here in Middle Tennessee (Zone 7a), the recommendation from the University of Tennessee Extension is to dig up and dry the corms after the foliage dies back and before a heavy frost, but the truth is, most gardeners I talk to here leave the corms in the ground and they usually survive.

In colder areas, they should be dug and stored. The Web site of the Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service (in Indiana) for example, says that gladiolus corms should be dug after frost. Dig the corms by loosening the soil so that you can pull the plant out of the ground. Shake off the loose soil and allow the corms to dry in the sun for a day or two. Cut the foliage off 1 – 2 inches above the corms and store them in a cool, dry place.

Plant the corms again after the soil has warmed up, in late April or May. By planting in two-week intervals between May and July, you can have a succession of blooms for several weeks beginning about mid-summer.

Tomatoes: How late is too late?

QUESTION: I have some tomato transplants from spring that have not been planted. They are tall and skinny, but still look healthy. Is it too late to plant them now?
tomatoes green

Ideally, healthy tomato transplants should be planted in mid to late April or early May (or after the last frost date in your area). To wait until late June to get the transplants in the ground is asking for trouble, but if you have the space to plant and the time to coddle them through the summer heat, you might as well try. Plant them deep, or dig a trench and lay the stem on its side with the leaves at the top of the stem above the soil. Provide a dose of water-soluble fertilizer, water them well and keep the soil moist.

Planting in the heat of summer, you are likely to encounter problems with insects, slower growth, delayed blooming and soil that dries out too quickly for the young plants to grow well. But if the plants pull through the worst of it, you may be rewarded with a small crop of fall tomatoes.

If you’re late to start a garden this year and still want to have home-grown vegetables and herbs, consider these quick-start choices that should come up right away from seed: cucumbers, bush beans, summer squash, beets, carrots, scallions, basil, dill. Keep the bed moist after you sow.

And look ahead to fall when you can plant lettuce, turnip and mustard greens, cabbage, spinach, kale, and other favorite cool-season vegetables.